Uber avoids federal prosecution over information breach that uncovered information of 57 million customers

By Igor Bonifacic Uber has formally accepted accountability for hiding a 2016 information breach that

By Igor Bonifacic

Uber has formally accepted accountability for hiding a 2016 information breach that uncovered the info of . On Friday, the corporate entered right into a non-prosecution settlement with the Federal Commerce Fee (FTC), reviews . As a part of the deal, Uber admitted it failed to tell the company of the cyberattack. It additionally agreed to cooperate within the prosecution of former chief safety officer Joe Sullivan who was fired by the corporate shortly after the incident got here to mild.

Uber didn’t instantly reply to Engadget’s request for remark. The corporate first revealed the small print of the info breach in 2017. As a substitute of sharing what it knew in regards to the incident with the federal government and customers, the corporate paid hackers $100,000 to the delete the data and keep quiet. “None of this could have occurred, and I cannot make excuses for it,” stated Dara Khosrowshahi, Uber’s , on the time of the disclosure. “Whereas I can’t erase the previous, I can commit on behalf of each Uber worker that we’ll be taught from our errors.” In 2018, Uber paid $148 million to settle allegations by US state attorneys common the corporate was too gradual to reveal the incident.

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Supply: Engadget.

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